MT. WATERMAN, SAN GABRIEL MTS JUNE 2015
PAGE ONE
Photographs by Michael Charters





Having recently done the section of the PCT from Cloudburst Summit to Cooper Canyon and up to Buckhorn Campground, Tom Chester and I were curious as to how different the flora would be on the higher side of the Angeles Crest Highway. It had been seven years since I was last on this trail and I remembered it fondly for its airy and woodsy feel. Although Tom had been in the area recently, he had not been to the actual summit of Mt. Waterman, and there was one plant in particular that he was eager to see, Brewer's lupine, which in the San Gabriels is known only from this location. It was a lovely and cool day as we ascended the heights, and then instead of returning the same way dropped down via a dirt road through the Mt. Waterman ski lift property, an area that has probably seen little to no skiing in recent years. I was very pleased to find the Brewer's lupine in the same exact spot where I had seen it in 2008, and then we found some much more extensive patches of it further along the trail on the way from the peak toward the top of the ski lift. It is a very cute diminutive plant which shares a flat open sandy/gravelly habitat with its cousin Lupinus elatus. The summit of Mt. Waterman is 8,035', making it a 1,265' climb over 2.75 miles, and the trailhead is approximately 34 miles east of La Canada. The photos shown here were taken 6/24/15.


   
Summer lupine
Lupinus formosus
Fabaceae



 
Western needlegrass
Stipa occidentalis var. occidentalis
Poaceae


 
 
Bracken fern
Pteridium aquilinum var. pubescens
Dennstaedtiaceae
 
 
 
 
Woolly mountain parsley
Oreonana vestita
Apiaceae
Brewer's monkeyflower
Mimulus breweri
Phrymaceae
 
 


   
Chickweed oxytheca
Sidotheca caryophylloides
Polygonaceae



 
California brome
Bromus carinatus var. carinatus
Poaceae
 
 
 
Bush chinquapin
Chrysolepis sempervirens
Fagaceae


 
Coast range triteleia
Triteleia lugens
Themidaceae


 
 
Coville's rush
Juncus covillei
Juncaceae
 
 



 
Golden yarrow
Eriophyllum confertiflorum var. confertiflorum
Asteraceae



 
Yosemite rock-cress
Boechera repanda
Brassicaceae
   
Wild tarragon
Artemisia dracunculus
Asteraceae
 


 
Western wallflower
Erysimum capitatum ssp. capitatum
Brassicaceae
  Grinnell's penstemon
Penstemon grinnellii var. grinnellii
Plantaginaceae


   
Volcanic gilia
Gilia ochroleuca var. vivida
Polemoniaceae
I have often wondered why this taxon was called volcanic gilia and assumed that it had something to do with its habitat, yet all the places where I have seen several varieties of it have not been volcanic areas. Tom Chester told me that "Marcus Jones collected the type specimen of Gilia ochroleuca (now Gilia ochroleuca ssp. ochroleuca) from the Darwin Mesa (Darwin Plateau in the Argus Mountains), and that mesa is made of basaltic volcanic rock." Thanks to Tom for this information. 


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