NORTHERN INYO COUNTY PART ONE
APRIL/MAY 2022 PAGE ONE
Photographs by Michael Charters



The Covid epidemic had kept me cooped up for two years since my excursion to the Amargosa Valley, but in late April I drove up to Bishop in the Owens Valley to participate in my 20th Jepson workshop which was aimed at investigating the flora of a number of areas in northern Inyo County. Our trip leaders were the highly knowledgeable Dana York, former botanist of Death Valley National Park, and Steve Schoenig who has been studying monkeyflowers for the past 35 years and is conducting floristic studies of the northern Death Valley region. This was my sixth workshop with Dana, and he is always one of the best. The photographs in this gallery are from the Friday and Sunday of the workshop, but since one full day (Saturday) was planned to be a long drive to Eureka Dunes which I have visited twice before (see my Eureka Dunes photo gallery), I opted to spend that day with Steve Matson who lives in the area and knows as much about the flora there as anyone, and we spent that day at some locations the workshop was not scheduled to visit. The photographs from that day's outings will appear in Northern Inyo County Part Two. The Bishop area is a wonderful one and I have always loved driving up the 395 through the Owens Valley with the rugged often snow-capped peaks of the Sierras to the west and the softer but nearly as high White and Inyo Mountains to the east. Inyo County is the second largest in California, an area so big that several eastern states together could fit within its borders. With only about 18,000 residents, it is also one of the least populated, and 99% of the land there is designated as public, owned by the National Park Service, BLM, the US Forest Service, China Lake Naval Weapons Station, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the state of California.The name 'Inyo' has been commonly believed to be a Paiute word meaning "dwelling place of the great spirit," although there is some belief now that it may be a mistranslation of the word "indio," Spanish for 'indian,' which the Paiutes could have heard from other tribes and were using to try to indicate to settlers that this was 'indian' land. The Owens Valley was named for Richard Owens who was a member of John C. Frémont's exploration in 1845. Our destinations for this part of the field trip were primarily into the Buttermilk and Tungsten Hills.


     
Nevada gilia
Gilia brecciarum ssp. brecciarum
Polemoniaceae

[Named for Italian naturalist, clergyman and Director of the Vatican Observatory Filippo Luigi Gilii, 1756-1821]


 
 
Alkali ivesia
Ivesia kingii var. kingii
Rosaceae

[Named for Eli Ives, 1779-1861, and Clarence Rivers King, 1842-1901]
 
 



 
Yellow peppergrass
Lepidium flavum
Brassicaceae



   
Arrowscale
Stutzia covillei
Chenopodiaceae

[Named for Howard Coombs Stutz, 1918-2010, and Frederick Vernon Coville, 1867-1937]


   
Woolly sunflower
Eriophyllum lanatum var. obovatum
Asteraceae



 
Bishop milkvetch
Astragalus sepultipes
Fabaceae
 
 
 
Birdnest buckwheat
Eriogonum nidularium
Polygonaceae


 
Blackbrush
Coleogyne ramosissima
Rosaceae


Beavertail cactus
Opuntia basilaris
Cactaceae
 
 
     
Yellow turban
Eriogonum pusillum
Polygonaceae


 
Black greasewood
Sarcobatus vermiculatus
Sarcobataceae


   
Rubber rabbitbrush
Ericameria nauseosa
Asteraceae

 
Roundleaf oxytheca
Oxytheca perfoliata
Polygonaceae
 
Rush seepweed
Suaeda nigra
Chenopodiaceae

 
PHOTO GALLERIES
INDEX
CALFLORA.NET PAGE TWO
OF SIX
CALIFORNIA PLANT NAMES: LATIN AND GREEK MEANINGS AND DERIVATIONS


Copyright @ 2022 by Michael L. Charters
The photographs contained on these pages may not be reproduced without the express written permission of the author.
Comments and/or questions may be addressed to mmlcharters[at]gmail.com.