PACIFIC CREST TRAIL FROM ISLIP SADDLE TO THROOP
PEAK, SAN GABRIEL MOUNTAINS
JUNE 2013
PAGE ONE
Photographs by Michael Charters




Once again the Los Angeles basin was totally socked in by a thick, moist overcast which became a thick, moist fog as I drove up the winding Angeles Crest Highway at 7 am. I was becoming concerned that the entire range might be covered when just before the Mt. Wilson turnoff the fog brightened and then disappeared, and the sky was blue and the mountain peaks were illuminated by an early morning sun. The views to the south were fantastic, appearing to be a vast white ocean with dark islands popping up here and there. It was 55° when I began my hike at Islip Saddle and the temperatures remained in the 60's all day with a lovely cool (almost cold at times) breeze, especially on the parts of the trail that were exposed on the south-facing side. I met Jane Tirrell observing her study plants at Windy Gap, and then pressed on to Throop Peak. I only met two other people all day. This area of the San Gabriels and the Pacific Crest Trail is a magnificent one, but many of the things that will be blooming later in the summer and fall are barely beginning to bud out now. I should take this opportunity to mention that unlike Tom Chester's trail guides which list only those species within close proximity to the trail, these photo galleries include pictures sometimes taken on short side excursions such as to the summit of Pacifico Mountain, Little Jimmy Spring, where the lemon lilies were, Dawson Saddle where the mousetail ivesia was, Lamel Spring, or offtrail in places not necessarily visible from the trail itself. I am however maintaining a list of only those species that I have observed on or from the trail itself. Incidentally, Throop is pronounced 'Troop,' and according to John Robinson was named for Amos G. Throop, founder of Cal Tech. The photographs in this gallery were taken on 6/24/13 and 7/1/13. The list of species for this segment of the PCT is here.


 
 
Lemon lily
Lilium parryi
Liliaceae

[Leaves whorled (L) on mature plants
or alternate (R) on young plants. What appears here to be a 5-tepalled flower
is I think a case of one tepal being
positioned directly behind another or
just some abberant development of the
flower ]
 
 
   



 
Yarrow
Achillea millefolium
Asteraceae


 
 
 
Hairy evening primrose
Oenothera elata ssp. hirsutissima
Onagraceae
 
 



   
An unusual sight on the Angeles Crest Highway
near Eagle's Roost
 
Silky lupine
Lupinus elatus
Fabaceae


 
Western wallflower
Erysimum capitatum var. capitatum
Brassicaceae
   
Blue wildrye ?
Elymus glaucus var. glaucus
Poaceae
     


 
San Bernardino rubber rabbitbrush
Ericameria nauseosa var. bernardina
Asteraceae

[Photo on right shows E.n. var. bernardina at left and E.n. var. oreophila at right.]


 
 
Hairy sun cup
Camissoniopsis hirtella
Onagraceae
 
 



 

Groundsmoke
Gayophytum sp.
Onagraceae
[Named for French naturalist Claude Gay, 1800-1873]




   
Prickly-nut cryptantha
Cryptantha muricata var. denticulata
Boraginaceae
 
 
Poodle-dog bush
Eriodictyon parryi
Boraginaceae

[Nsmed for botanist Dr. Charles Christopher Parry, 1823-1890]


   
Incense-cedar
Calocedrus decurrens
Cupressaceae
 
White fir
Abies concolor
Pinaceae


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